Choose to Choose Spill Kits

Spill Kits are available in three types, general purpose, oil & fuel and chemical. By knowing what liquids you need to absorb will allow you to decide which type of kit you should choose. The table below gives an ‘at a glance’ synopsis of each types attributes.

Type Chemicals Solvents Oils & Fuels Common Fluids Used On Water
General Purpose
Oil & Fuel Some
Chemical

Always refer to our Selection Guide for a more comprehensive listing.

Size
Unfortunately there are no written rules as to the size of kit you need to choose. Whether you need to cater for a 20 Litre drum or a 1000 Litre IBC, we provide a range of 84 kits available in all three types ranging from 15 Litres to 1100 Litres.
Your own risk assessments and the flexibility of being able to apply an unrestricted ‘common sense’ approach will help you determine the size of kit right for you.

Remember: If you store more than 200 Litres of oil/chemicals on site in containers, they MUST be stored in either a bunded area or on a drip tray/spill pallet.
Read more about the Spillage Regulations

Case Study 1 – IBC
I have an IBC on site which I have been told I should have a spill kit for. What size of kit should I choose?
The IBC should already be on a bund, so in a worst case scenario of an IBC failure, you would hope that a majority of the liquid will be collected by the bund. Usage of contents mean that an IBC is very rarely full. If a forklift tyne were to puncture and move an IBC on its bund, a larger spillage could occur out of the bund. Therefore a kit in the region of 100 – 300 Litres may be a common sense size. Always consider a kit with drain protection if the IBC is sited in a sensitive area.

Case Study 2 – 4 x 205 Litre Drums
I have 4 x 205 Litre Drums on site which I have been told I should have a spill kit for. What size of kit should I choose?
The drums need to be stored on a spill pallet having a minimum sump capacity of 205 Lires. You should always think along the lines of ‘how often are all 4 drums full?’ and ‘what is the likelihood of all 4 drums failing/being knocked over at the same time?’. A kit in the region of 100 – 255 Litres may be a common sense size. Always consider a kit with drain protection if the drums are sited in a sensitive area.

Case Study 3 – 6 x 25 Litre Drums
I have 6 x 25 Litre Drums on site which I have been told I should have a spill kit for. What size of kit should I choose?
It is not a legal requirement to store these on a drip tray/spill pallet, although it should always be a consideration and is good house keeping. We supply a range of 5L & 25L spill trays designed specifically for this at very affordable prices. A kit in the region of 20 – 100 Litres may be a common sense size depending on whether you decide to use spill trays or not. Again, what is the likelihood of all 6 drums failing/being knocked over at the same time?

Liquids stored at multiple locations
If you store liquids at multiple locations on site, consider having smaller spill kits at each location or a larger wheeled kit at a central location. Moreover, having a mixture of both allows you to deal instantly with small spills, while for larger spills, allows you to react instantly with the smaller kit whilst the larger kit is sourced from its central location.

Refills
Refills are available for all our kits, saving you money by not having to buy the ‘container’ again. Individual elements of each kit are also available to buy separately.